September 2017 IVES Update Newsletter

We'll be covering: Check out our feature article Mobile Elevating Work Platforms - Eight Stages of Risk Assessment, OSHA fines, a question on documentation and complying with regulations, What You Need to Know About Forklift Fork Replacement, incident report, interesting articles and much more!


In this edition we'll be covering the following topics:

  • Mobile Elevating Work Platforms - Eight Stages of Risk Assessment.
  • Company Faces Penalties of $95,064 After Worker Buried in Trench Collapse.
  • LA County Fined $11M for Pedestrian Injured by Forklift.
  • Ask Bob: Our tech guru addresses a question on documentation and complying with regulations.
  • What You Need to Know About Forklift Fork Replacement.
  • Incident Report: Worker Fatally Injured in Fall From Forklift.
  • Last chance to register!
  • What's Wrong With This? Photo and answer.
  • A selection of interesting articles.
  • New testimonials from our wonderful clients.

But first, check out all the places we delivered training this month...


Mobile Elevating Work Platforms - Eight Stages of Risk Assessment


With so much changing in the updated ANSI/CSA standards, it is important to call attention to one key item that every user (identified in the standards as employers) needs to be aware of. This includes risk assessment. Here are the eight stages of risk assessment every user must follow under the new standards:

Identify the task to be undertaken

The first stage in the risk assessment is that the task to be undertaken is clearly identified, together with the location and timing.

Select an appropriate MEWP

With so many different types of MEWPs available to choose from, ranging in various rated capacities, working heights and reaches, a user must select an appropriate machine based upon consideration of factors, including — but not limited to — the task to be undertaken, the constraints of the worksite, ground conditions, site access and proximity to the public or other workers.

Assessment of the risks associated with the task

The risks associated with the task specific to a MEWPs’ operations must be identified. These might be associated with the location where the work is to be carried out, the nature of the MEWPs or the personnel, materials and equipment to be carried.

Identify control measures

Once the hazards and risks involved in the task have been identified, the procedures and measures required to control them must be identified and implemented.

Identify safe work procedures

The risk assessment results are used to plan safe work procedures, including any contingencies required, in carrying out the identified tasks.

Rescue from height

Rescue planning is a necessary component of a risk assessment when working at height. Some situations require prior planning to ensure a safe and timely rescue.

A system failure of the MEWPs that results in the loss of the platform control functions may be addressed by the use of:

  1. The MEWP auxiliary power function of the controls;
  2. The MEWP secondary manual emergency descent controls.


The user must follow the manufacturer’s directions in the use of these systems. This plan should be included in operator and occupant training.

A fall from the platform when using a fall arrest system will require a rescue plan to determine how the affected worker will return safely to the platform or ground. The plan must be put in writing and become part of the company’s training manual. All occupants must receive training that explains procedures to follow if they fall and await rescue or witness another worker’s fall. Ideally this plan will limit the time that an occupant is suspended after an arrested fall.

A rescue plan can include the following:

  1. Self-rescue – by person involved;
  2. Assisted rescue – by other in the work area;
  3. Technical rescue – by emergency services.


As part of the plan, consideration must be given to the rescue of MEWPs’ occupants if the machine is unable to be lowered for any reason, such as complete machine malfunction or work platform entanglement.

In the case of platform entanglement, the operator and occupants must be removed from the platform prior to attempts being made to free the platform. MEWPs which have tipped beyond their center of gravity must be stabilized and secured before attempting rescue. Technical rescue might also be necessary in the event of illness, injury or risk of exposure. Any rescue procedure must take into account the reasons why the platform may be stranded at height and any need for prompt action.

Rescue should always be carried out by appropriately trained personnel, using the machine’s ground controls or secondary lowering system when feasible. All rescue procedures near electrical conductors must comply with section 6.8.11 of the Standard.

Communicate the Results

The user must communicate the results of the risk assessment to all parties involved.

Review and Adjust

Before a job starts and periodically throughout a long-term job, the risk assessment must be reviewed to check if any parts of the tasks or the working environment have changed and determine the effect that it could have on the safety of the operation. If any modifications to the risk assessment are required, these must be communicated to all those involved prior to resuming the job.

Source: www.aerialpros.genielift.com


Company Faces Penalties of $95,064 After Worker Buried in Trench Collapse


EMERY, SD
– The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited First Dakota Enterprises Inc., for failing to protect its workers from trench collapse hazards. The Fort Pierre-based company faces proposed penalties of $95,064.

On May 23, 2017, a 34-year-old worker was completely buried when the walls of a 14-foot trench collapsed around him. Co-workers quickly freed the victim’s head, which allowed him to breathe while emergency personnel worked for more than 30 minutes to free him.

OSHA investigators determined that First Dakota Enterprises Inc., failed to use a trench protective system or conduct regular site inspections to correct potentially hazardous conditions. OSHA cited the company, which was contracted by the City of Emery to replace the city’s main sewer and water lines, for two repeat and one serious safety violations.

Trench collapses are among the most dangerous hazards in the construction industry. As of June 1, 2017, 15 workers have died in trench collapses. In 2016, a total of 23 deaths occurred in trench and excavation operations.

“Trench collapses are preventable,” said OSHA Area Director Sheila Stanley in Sioux Falls. “It is critical that employers involved in excavation work review their safety procedures to ensure that employees are properly protected and trained. Had it not been for the heroic actions of these co-workers, this dangerous collapse may have ended in tragedy.”

Trenching standards require protective systems on trenches deeper than 5 feet, and soil and other materials kept at least 2 feet from the edge of a trench. OSHA offers a wide range of resources and guidance information on its trenching and excavations page. Learn more about OSHA’s e-tool for safe excavation and trenching.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

Source: www.osha.gov


LA County Fined $11M for Pedestrian Injured by Forklift


A California state court jury has fined the County of Los Angeles USD10.8 million in a lawsuit filed by a man who suffered severe injuries when a county employee ran over his legs with a forklift.

The jury found the county liable for the injuries of James Cobb, who was 34 when the accident occurred in 2015 on the grounds of County USC Hospital.

The award is more than double the county’s highest settlement offer, according to Cobb’s attorney Steve Vartazarian.
Vartazarian told Courtroom View Network that the county offered to settle the case for USD5 million during jury deliberations after initially making a USD1.5 million settlement offer before the trial began.

Defense attorneys denied all liability for the accident and argued Cobb could have avoided the forklift if he’d paid better attention while walking through the crosswalk where the collision occurred.

At the time of the accident, Cobb, an employee of Classic Party Rentals, was working on the grounds of County USC Hospital to oversee a tent installation for two events happening on the campus.

While walking through a crosswalk after parking his car, Cobb was struck from behind by a forklift driven by hospital employee John Hill, who allegedly failed to yield to Cobb and did not honk his horn to alert Cobb of his approach.

Source: www.forkliftaction.com


Ask Bob


Q. We have just hired an individual at our company to operate our forklift. He has proof that his previous employer had trained him. What are we required to do to make sure we are complying with the regulations?

A. First of all, make sure that the documentation verifies that his previous training is appropriate for the work being done at your site. This person may have been trained to operate a forklift, but it may have been a different type of forklift and/or a different application. If this is the case, he will need to be brought up to speed (trained) on the ins and outs of your worksite and possibly your equipment as well.

You will need to evaluate this person on your site using the same type of equipment that he will be operating. All of this training (if needed) and evaluating must be done by someone with the knowledge, training and experience to train operators and evaluate their competence. Finally, don't forget to document everything!


What You Need to Know About Forklift Fork Replacement


A forklift's forks often go under-inspected and overlooked in many cases, and most companies are unaware of how often these forks should be inspected and how to do so.

Experts say that forklift forks should be visually inspected on a per-operation basis, and in addition to a visual inspection, federal law mandates a more thorough annual inspection be carried out by a trained professional.

During the visual inspection, the forks should be inspected for signs of bends, cracks or excessive wear or damage to either the fork tine or the positioning lock when using an ITA mounted fork.

What to look for

Excessive wear to the forks
Forklift forks can decrease in thickness over time just from normal wear. If the wear to the fork is over 10 percent of the total thickness however, it is considered excessive. Once forks show this much wear, they need to be replaced.

Fractures caused by collision, stress
When having forks inspected, look closely for gouges and fractures. Parts of the fork closest to the machine and the fork heel usually receive the most wear, and even small gouges and cracks are signs that a fork needs to be replaced.

Fork tip
Fork tips are usually the first part of the fork to come in contact with material, and excessive wear or damage to the tips is an indicator that the forks need to be replaced.

Bends and uneven surfaces
From shank to blade, all forks are delivered with a 90-degree angle. If there are any bends or uneven surfaces detected on the shank or blade, the forks will need replacing.

Fork blade height differences
The height difference of each fork blade should stay within three percent of the fork length. For example, if the forks are 42 inches long, the allowable difference in the fork height would be 1.26 inches, and any difference in fork height beyond 1.26 inches is a sign that both forks should be replaced.

Fork hook
A few notable signs that the fork hooks (hangers) need to be replaced are crushing, pulling, noticeable wear or other deformities. Along with those, the hooks should be replaced if the wear to the hook is causing an excessive amount of distance between the fork and the carriage.

Positioning lock
If damage to the positioning lock hinders it from locking completely, it (the pin, fork, or the forklift itself) should immediately be removed from action until it (the pin or fork) can be replaced. Not only is operating without a fully functional positioning lock unsafe, it is also illegal.

Questions to ask when getting ready to replace forks.

Should they be replaced in pairs?


A common question that’s asked is whether or not forks need to be replaced singularly or in pairs. While the wear, tear and damage may only be apparent on one fork, it is not safe to only replace them one at a time. Experts highly recommend replacing forks in pairs to ensure they are both working equally.

When a forklift has two forks with different and unique amounts of wear and disproportionate hours of usage, it can create a multitude of safety and operational issues.

Are custom repairs or modifications to the forks okay?

Experts recommend seeking professional help when it comes to repairs and modifications. This ensures that the job is done correctly and that the forks will meet safety standards.

How is replacement fork quality determined?

When forks are made with high quality boron-carbon alloy high strength steel, they are rated 20 percent stronger than those made with 40CR. Additionally, forks fully immersed in industrial heat treatment ovens and cooling pools have been found to be the most durable. Forklift forks that are premium quality should exceed or meet all ANSI/ITSDF and ISO standards.

Source: www.totallandscapecare.com


Worker Fatally Injured in Fall From Forklift


A warehouse worker was fatally injured after falling seven feet from a wooden pallet elevated by a forklift. The warehouse inventory was stored on steel storage racks with the highest shelves about eight feet above the concrete floor. It was common practice for warehouse workers to place one foot or both feet on a pallet and move inventory on the top shelf (see Figure 1) while a coworker lifted them to the top shelf using the forklift, even though the equipment was not designed for this purpose. At the time of the incident, the worker slipped on the pallet while moving inventory and fell. The worker was taken to the hospital where he died from his injuries a few days later.

LIKELY CAUSES

Controls were not in place to prevent workers from improperly using equipment and falling to the ground. Specifically, the employer did not:

  • Provide workers with equipment for safely reaching inventory stored on elevated shelves.
  • Follow manufacturer instructions and prohibit employees from using pallets on forklifts to access upper shelves.
  • Provide training and certification to forklift operators on how to safely use and operate forklifts, including not using them to lift workers without an approved personnel lifting platform.

INCIDENT PREVENTION

Accessing warehouse storage shelves by lifting workers on pallets presents serious fall hazards. The employer must implement safe procedures and provide the proper equipment and training to prevent injuries and fatalities. Pallets are not designed for sitting or standing, nor should they be used for lifting workers with a forklift. Instead, employers should use manufacturer-approved personnel lifting platforms.

To prevent a similar incident from occurring:

  • Do not allow workers to ride on or occupy pallets lifted by forklifts.
  • Provide workers with the proper tools and equipment for each task, including accessing working surfaces* (e.g. elevated storage shelves in a warehouse).
  • Equipment designed for lifting workers in a warehouse include:
    • Manufactured personnel platforms, designed for lifting workers on a forklift, which incorporate fall protection (i.e., guardrail systems). This option requires prior written approval from the forklift manufacturer (29 CFR 1910.178(a)(4)).
    • High-lift order pickers, a powered industrial truck class equipped with personal fall arrest equipment that are designed to lift the operator alongside the forks. (See Figure 2.)


Provide training on forklifts to workers who operate and work near them. Training should include formal instruction and hands-on training at a level and in a language workers understand. Employers must ensure that workers do not operate a forklift with another worker on the pallet, and that they follow manufacturers’ instructions (29 CFR 1910.178(l)(1)).

  • Provide workers with fall protection and ensure their proper use in accordance with the Walking-Working Surfaces rule and personal fall protection system standards.

*Platforms on a forklift = Scaffolding On January 17, 2017, an update to
Walking-Working Surfaces defined work platforms used on a forklift as a scaffold. General industry workplaces must follow the construction standards for scaffolds when lifting workers on platforms 29 CFR 1910.27(a).

Source: www.osha.gov


Last Chance Programs


We have lots of upcoming programs to choose from, but seats are limited. Click a link for more details and to register online!

US Training Programs

Sep 15

Trainer Recertification

Kent, WA

$295

Sep 18-22

Loader Group Trainer

Sacramento, CA

$1,650

Sep 18-22

Premium Combo Trainer

Rancho Cucamonga, CA

$2,145

Sep 29

Trainer Recertification

Salt Lake City, UT

$295

Oct 9-12

Premium Forklift Trainer

Kapolei, HI

$1,375

Oct 13

Trainer Recertification

Aiea, HI

$295

Oct 9-13

Loader Group Trainer

Bismarck, ND

$1,650

Oct 10-12

Aerial Lifts Trainer

Sacramento, CA

$1,375

Oct 13

Trainer Recertification

Sacramento, CA

$295

Canadian Training Programs

Sep 25-29

Loader Group Trainer

Abbotsford, BC

$1,650

Oct 2

Excavator Trainer Upgrade

Abbotsford, BC

$545

Oct 11-12

Express Forklift Trainer

Abbotsford, BC

$1,095

Oct 13

Trainer Recertification

Abbotsford, BC

$295

Oct 16-18

Aerial Lifts Trainer

Abbotsford, BC

$1,375

Oct 23-27

Premium Combo Trainer

Saskatoon, SK

$2,145

Oct 23-26

Premium Forklift Trainer

Oshawa, ON

$1,375

Oct 27

Trainer Recertification

Oshawa, ON

$295

Oct 30

Trainer Recertification

Saskatoon, SK

$295

Oct 30-Nov 2

Premium Forklift Trainer

Abbotsford, BC

$1,375

For more programs or to register, view our calendar!


What's Wrong With This? Photo

Can you tell what's going wrong in this photo?


Have a photo you'd like to share? Send it to us!


Answer to Last Month's WWWT? Photo


Here’s what Vertikal Net had to say about it:

Spotted in Watford, UK this week, a man using a 62ft boom – excellent – but making no effort to alert passing vehicles that he was partially blocking one lane of the road or to bother with a harness or to keep both feet planted on the platform floor as he appears to be standing on the midrail.

Clearly the decision to use a platform for this work at height – painting and caulking – is by the far the most important thing that he could do to make the job safer.

But having gone the expense of renting a platform he – or his employer- has clearly ignored any hand over information and is working from a stretch of road near a corner or junction and in spite of this, there are no cones or warnings, at least from the direction our correspondent was coming.

As if this was not bad enough he is operating the boom lift at an outreach of around nine meters and a height of 11 meters or so – and has not bothered to put a harness on, let alone attach a short lanyard. If a passing truck was to clip the platform chassis there is a chance that the catapult effect would throw him to the ground – causing serious injury or death, while traumatizing anyone passing at the time. At least this unit, a Genie Z-62/40 has no tailswing- making it a little less treacherous.

Source: www.vertikal.net

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