March 2017 IVES Update Newsletter

We'll be covering: Check out our feature article Ontario working at heights training deadline, on-site training, worker killed in boomlift crash, a question on refresher training, holiday closure, incident report, interesting articles and much more!


In this edition we'll be covering the following topics:

  • Ontario working at heights training deadline approaching.
  • On-site training at your location.
  • Worker killed and another hurt in boomlift crash with Metromover.
  • Ask Bob: Our tech guru addresses a question on refresher training.
  • IVES Holiday Closure: Friday, April 14.
  • An incident report on a boomlift fatality.
  • Last chance to register!
  • What's Wrong With This? Photo and answer.
  • A selection of interesting articles.
  • New testimonials from our wonderful clients.

But first, check out all the places we are delivering training this month...


Ontario Working at Heights Training Deadline Approaching

Approaching deadline: April 1, 2017

All workers who use fall protection on a construction project must complete an approved working at heights training program. This includes workers who met the fall protection training requirements of the Construction Projects Regulation prior to April 1, 2015.

Employers

As of April 1, 2015, employers must ensure that certain workers complete a working at heights training program that has been approved by the Chief Prevention Officer (CPO) and delivered by a CPO approved training provider before they can work at heights.

The training requirement is for workers on construction projects who use any of the following methods of fall protection: travel restraint systems, fall restricting systems, fall arrest systems, safety nets and work belts or safety belts.

There is a two-year transition period for workers who, prior to April 1, 2015, met the fall protection training requirements set out in subsection 26.2(1) of the Construction Projects Regulation. These workers will have until April 1, 2017 to complete an approved working at heights training program.

This training requirement is in the Occupational Health and Safety Awareness and Training Regulation, and is in addition to training requirements under the Construction Regulation.

Homeowners

Depending on the circumstances, homeowners may be considered constructors and subject to obligations under Occupational Health and Safety Act if they hire multiple contractors to work at the same time.

It is in a homeowner’s best interest to make sure workers at their home are safe. This can be as simple as asking contractors if their workers have been trained, and how they plan to keep workers safe on site, before signing a contract.

In the case of projects where workers will be at heights, such as repairing a roof, homeowners should ask contractors if their workers have been trained to do the work safely.

Regulatory Requirements

Approved Training Provider:

        Fall Protection Group
        260 Export Blvd.
        Mississauga, Ontario L5S 1Y9
        Tel: 888-325-5776
        https://fallprogroup.com/
        Name of Program: Fall Protection Working at Heights

Source: www.labour.gov.on.ca


On-Site Training at Your Location!

Looking for on-site mobile equipment training? Request a quote and we will deliver a customized training solution to fit your needs! Whether you need a Train the Trainer Program for forklifts, aerial lifts or loaders, we can help. Submit your request for a Custom On-Site Training Program and see how easy it is to get the IVES Training System™ working for you!


Worker Killed and Another Hurt in Boomlift Crash with Metromover

One construction worker was killed and another seriously injured in a collision between their boom lift and a Metromover car early Wednesday, according to Miami-Dade police.

Oscar Cabrera, 43, died at Jackson Memorial Hospital’s Ryder Trauma Center. Luis Perez, 37, was treated and released.

Metromover’s inner loop remained closed Wednesday morning, with buses running between Government Center and Miami Avenue to handle the normal passenger load. The stricken car remained on the track into the afternoon. Service remained out during the Wednesday afternoon rush hour, during which Miami-Dade Transit announced service would return Thursday morning at 5 a.m.

The Omni and Brickell loops of Metromover, the driverless light rail system, were not affected and running as usual.

No passengers were on board the train, which closes to the public at midnight on weeknights. The crash happened during a maintenance run around 1 a.m.

The county says the Suffolk Construction boom, working on Brightline’s Miami Central Station at Northwest Fifth Street and First Avenue, hit the moving Metromover car. The accident tableau featured an unnatural looking bend in the boom lift that put the top portion with the carriage at a downward angle.

In the last 10 years, Suffolk Construction hasn’t had any Occupational Safety and Health Administration violations in Florida.

The workers were ejected in the collision, with one dangling from the side of the boom. He was helped to the ground by co-workers, according to rescuers.

“When we arrived, they were already on the ground,” Miami Fire Rescue spokesman Capt. Ignatius Carroll told reporters.

Miami-Dade police, Miami-Dade Transit and OSHA are investigating.

“We are saddened by this tragic incident,” Alice Bravo, director of the county’s Department of Transit and Public Works, said in a statement. “We are cooperating with the investigating authorities. Safety has always been a top priority for Miami-Dade Transit and we will continue to put safety first in all that we do.”

Source: www.miamiherald.com


Ask Bob

Q: I am an IVES trainer. I was asked to put one of our team members/employees in a refresher class because of a minor accident he was involved in. Do I give this individual the re-cert theory test or the final theory test? What all should I cover in my class? And will I have to give this person a new forklift license or can they use their current license?

A: Awesome question and I am so glad you asked. Many people skip over doing Refresher training as required in the U.S. by OSHA/CALOSHA and others, so I am happy to hear it being addressed. Refresher training does not mean you have to put them through an entire recertification program but you could blend the two if you wanted. Technically, in this case refresher training needs to be a process where you cover what their error was in operations, document the discussion and/or method you used to retrain them to avoid the error in the future and then do a practical evaluation to show on paper that the error is corrected and that they can demonstrate how to do the operations properly. You would not need to issue a new certificate in this scenario.

You could also put the person through a recertification program using the study guide, address their error within the program and then give them the recertification test and do a complete re-evaluation (pre-use inspection and at least four loads - involving the corrected error), while documenting in the comments section that the "error" was seen to be corrected. You now have a recertification/refresher training all in one and you can give them an updated card with a new expiration date. Again, great job for thinking to ask!!!!


IVES Holiday Closure

Please note that our offices will be closed on Friday, April 14 in observation of Good Friday.


Worker Killed While on a Boomlift Installing a Tower Sign

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has opened an investigation into the death of a 47-year-old West Dundee man who was killed Friday while installing a sign on a tower at Geneva Commons.

"A worker was crushed while he was in his aerial lift while he was working on a sign," said OSHA spokesman Scott Allen. "We do have two OSHA compliance officers at the scene. We're conducting interviews with potential witnesses, the employer and employees."

Authorities said Donald J. Tentler, 47, was killed in the accident, which occurred at about 11:48 a.m. Friday. Tentler and another worker were at the top of the bell tower, according to a media release from the city of Geneva.

Firefighters found Tentler unconscious and unresponsive, and he was later pronounced dead at the scene. The other worker was able to walk down a fire truck ladder, but it took three hours to remove Tentler's body from the bell tower.

The Kane County coroner's office said it received a call from Geneva police around 12:30 p.m. to respond to the shopping center off Randall Road.

Kane County Coroner Rob Russell said an autopsy is scheduled for Monday and he offered his condolences to Tentler's family.

"It seems to be some kind of mechanical malfunction. Whether it was human error or mechanical (failure), I don't know," Russell said. "The worker was pinned by the lifting device."

Fire agencies assisting Geneva at the scene included St. Charles, West Chicago, and Batavia. Fermilab firefighters filled in at Geneva's fire station.

Source: www.oshatoday.com


Last Chance Programs

We have lots of upcoming programs to choose from, but seats are limited. Click a link for more details and to register online!

US Training Programs

Mar 20-24

Premium Combo Trainer

Bismarck, ND

$2,145

Mar 27-30

Premium Forklift Trainer

Sacramento, CA

$1,375

Mar 31

RT Forklift Trainer Upgrade

Sacramento, CA

$545

Apr 3-7

Loader Group Trainer

Bismarck, ND

$1,650

Apr 4-6

Aerial Lifts Trainer

Sacramento, CA

$1,375

Apr 7

Trainer Recertification

Sacramento, CA

$295

Apr 10-11

Express Skid Steer Loader

Sacramento, CA

$1,095

Apr 12

Excavator Trainer Upgrade

Sacramento, CA

$545

Canadian Training Programs

Mar 24

Trainer Recertification

Abbotsford, BC

$295

Mar 24

Trainer Recertification

Oshawa, ON

$295

Mar 27-31

Premium Combo Trainer

Saskatoon, SK

$2,145

Apr 3-6

Premium Forklift Trainer

Abbotsford, BC

$1,375

Apr 10-12

Aerial Lifts Trainer

Abbotsford, BC

$1,375

For more programs or to register, view our calendar!

 


What's Wrong With This? Photo

Can you tell what's going wrong in this photo?

Have a photo you'd like to share? Send it to us!


Answer to Last Month's WWWT? Photo


Some of the noteworthy safety hazards in the above photo are as follows:

1. The fact that one of the wheels of the unit is way up off the ground indicates that the platform is overloaded.
2. The pickup truck (or anything else for that matter) should not be parked underneath the platform as it is. If the guys in the platform drop any tools or materials from the platform, it would cause damage to the truck.
3. Since the lift is being used on a grade as it appears to be, the wheels need to be chocked.
4. The cable or rope that appears to be hanging down from the platform should be removed as it could become entangled with the building and cause a hazard.
5. The work area around the unit and particularly the elevated platform should be cordoned off with barrier tape and or cones as it appears open to vehicle and/or pedestrian traffic.

Have a photo you'd like to share? Send it to us!


Interesting Articles

What you need to know about the ANSI/ITSDF B56.6 Revision...more.
Proposed policy amendments to Partners Program in BC...more.
Forklifts hurt nearly 97,000 people every year...more.
United Rentals buys NES Rentals...more.
Genie introduces new lift guard...more.
Oregon rule changes to protect workers from falls...more.
Worker seriously injured in backhoe incident...more.
Forklift accident leaves 1 dead...more.



Client Testimonials

"The best forklift class taken in my military and commercial aviation career (39 years)". James, Hawaiian Airlines.

"IVES Training Group is above & beyond in their training methods and professionalism." Jon, Miwall Corp.

"Well worth the time and money." Josh, Equipment 4 Rent.


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